may 18, 1888

A preliminary meeting was held in the Elgin Hotel parlors Monday evening to discuss the matter of a proper celebration of America’s natal day. A committee of seven was appointed to make preliminary arrangement, and report at next meeting.

Aunt Katie Brumbaugh, one of Marion’s pioneers, and one of the best women who ever lived, returned from California last week, where she has been living for several years.

A slight frost Monday morning, May 14, 1888. Uncle George Griffith says the 10th of May was the latest ever before known here.

The famous sulphur springs, three miles north of Marion, promise to add greatly to Marion’s fame and fortune. A plat of the ground including the springs has been purchased and the property is being fixed up. The flow of pure, clear water is large, and its medical qualities undoubted. Marion is bound to become a great health resort.

People who complain of dull times will find things lively enough in a few weeks. The chigres (chiggers) will be on hand about that time.

Our fine friend, Frank Penland, the most cheerful, jolly, deserving blind man we ever saw, is erecting a two-story residence on his farm.

Mr. Wm. Kellett, our chief stone dealer, called our attention, Saturday, to a fine, substantial wagon upon which he was hauling a stone which weighed 5500 pounds. The wagon is Marion-made, and is a big card for John Worley, the maker.

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